The German perfect tense is just one of the various ways of making expressions of things that happened in the past. This is likened to the English past participle tense. It is the generally approved past tense used in Speech in German. Although it is possible to use the other past tenses as well but considered being “proud” by many. To make the perfect tense in German, the auxiliary verbs “haben” or “sein” is required together with the Partizip II of the verb.

The auxiliary verb is conjugated in present tense in the second position to the subject while the derived Partizip/ past participle of the verb is taken to the end of the sentence. The auxiliary verb “haben” is used when the verb is a non-motion/ intransitive verb. That means the verb does not require movement from point A to point B. But when the verb is transitive i.e, it requires motion from point A to point B or a change of state, the auxiliary verb “sein” is used instead. Although, certain German verbs use both “haben” and “sein” as their auxiliaries at different circumstances which will be talked about later on.

How to derive Partizip II

The Partizip II of the various categories are formed differently. Regardless, one common factor is the use of the prefix “ge-”. This formation would be broken down into seven groups of the three categories of german verbs listed below;

  • Regelmäßige Verben
  • Unregelmäßige Verben
  • Gemischte Verben
  • Verben mit -ieren
  • Trennbare Verben
  • Untrennbare Verben
  • Modal Verben

1. Regelmäßige Verben (Weak verbs)

To make the perfect tense of weak verbs, the verb must first be conjugated to the third person subject or pronoun (er/sie/es) in the present tense using the conjugation table below.

SubjectStem-ending t & dStem-ending s, z & ßAny other stem-endingVerb-ending with n
icheeee
duestststst
er/sie/esetttt
wirenenenen
ihretttt
sie/Sieenenenen
conjugation table for german weak verbs

After conjugating the verb to the third person subject, the prefix “ge-” should be added as shown in the description below.

Construction of the Partizip II of regelmäßige verben

More examples of Partizip II of regelmäßige Verben

VerbsAuxiliaryDerived Partizip IIEnglish translation
haben
machen
heiraten
lachen
lächeln
suchen
tanzen
spielen
sagen
reden
baden
spülen
warten
saugen
malen
wohnen
arbeiten
glauben
putzen
sammeln
hören
klettern
nähen
weinen
beten
setzen
haben
haben
haben
haben
haben
haben
haben
haben
haben
haben
haben
haben
haben
haben
haben
haben
haben
haben
haben
haben
haben
sein
haben
haben
haben
haben
gehabt
gemacht
geheiratet
gelacht
gelächelt
gesucht
getanzt
gespielt
gesagt
geredet
gebadet
gespült
gewartet
gesaugt
gemalt
gewohnt
gearbeitet
geglaubt
geputzt
gesammelt
gehört
geklettert
genäht
geweint
gebetet
gesetzt
had
made
married
laughed
smiled
searched
danced
played
said
talked
bathed
washed
waited
sucked
painted
resided
worked
believed
cleaned
gathered
heard
climbed
sown
cried
prayed
set/ placed
List of german weak verbs in the Partizip II

Usage;

  • Has the child had fever?—— hat das Kind Feber gehabt?
  • What have you done?—— was hast du getan?
  • I have cooked the food.—— ich habe das Essen gekocht.
  • We have believed the woman.—— wir haben die Frau geglaubt.
  • Patrick has climbed the tree.—— Patrick ist den Baum geklettert.
  • Has the man painted the house?—— hat der Mann das Haus gemalt?

2. Unregelmäßige Verben (Strong verbs)

Recall that these verbs have their stem-vowel changed in present tense. In past tense, they also do. To form the Partizip II of these verbs, they are not conjugated to the third person like the weak verbs but rather may or may not retain their finite form with modification of their stem-vowels when possible in addition to the prefix “ge-” but with few execeptions where the entire verb-form is modified.

Most strong verbs whose stem-vowels could not be changed in the present tense conjugation, are the ones that would mostly change in the perfect tense together with some consonant with some exceptions. Usually, those verbs that could change in the present tense do not change in the past tense. The possible perfect tense stem-vowel and consonant changes include:

Stem-vowel and consonant in the present tenseStem-vowel and consonant in the perfect tense
-ie-
-e-
-ä-
-ei-
-i-
-u-
-a- and -o-
-ß-
-ss-
-o-
-o-
-a- / -o-
-ie- / -i-*
-u- / -o- / -e-
-a-
does not change
-ss-
-ß-
Stem vowel and consonant changes of german strong verbs in the Partizip II

*“ei” changes to “ie” but to “i” when the next letters are “ss” eg beißen. This is because “ie” is a long vowel which does not go with “ss”. Read more on pronunciation.

For example “kommen” and “schreiben” would be…

More examples of Partizip II of unregelmäßige Verben

VerbsAuxiliaryDerived Partizip IIEnglish past participle
sein
tun
werden*1
esse
gehen
kommen
schreiben
finden
binden
sehen
geben
fliegen
fließen
fliehen
trinken
fahren*2
schlagen
backen
schwimmen
singen
fressen
steigen
schließen
fangen
tragen
bleiben
beißen
bitten
fallen
hängen*3
lassen*4
sterben
sitzen
stehen
nehmen
treffen
sein
haben
sein
haben
sein
sein
haben
haben
haben
haben
haben
sein
sein
sein
haben
haben/sein
haben
haben
sein
haben
haben
sein
haben
haben
haben
sein
haben
haben
sein
haben
haben
sein
haben
haben
haben
haben
gewesen
getan
geworden/worden
gegessen
gegangen
gekommen
geschrieben
gefunden
gebunden
gesehen
gegeben
geflogen
geflossen
geflohen
getrunken
gefahren
geschlagen
gebacken
geschwommen
gesungen
gefressen
gestiegen
geschlossen
gefangen
getragen
geblieben
gebissen
gebeten
gefallen
gehangen
gelassen/lassen
gestorben
gesessen
gestanden
genommen
getroffen
been
done
become
eaten
gone
come
written
found
bound
seen
given
flown
flown
fled
drunk
driven
hit/beaten
baked
swum
sung
eaten
stepped
closed
caught
worn/carried
stayed
bitten
requested
fallen
hung
let/left
died
sat
stood
taken
met
List of german strong verbs in the Partizip II

Note: *1worden is used only in the in the passive voice. *2uses “sein” when there is a direct object in the sentence and “haben” when there is no direct object. *3used also as gehängt. *4lassen is used when there is another main verb in the sentence.

Usage;

  • The man has not been to the doctor.—— der Mann ist nicht zum Arzt gewesen.
  • She would.—— sie ist geworden.
  • Everything has become new.—— alles ist neu geworden.
  • Dora has gone to the market.—— Dora ist zum Markt gegangen.
  • Have you drunk the wine?—— hast du den Wein getrunken?
  • John has written the letter.—— John hat den Brief geschrieben.
  • My father has driven the car to Berlin.—— mein Vater hat das Auto nach Berlin gefahren. (With direct Object)
  • My father has driven to Berlin.—— mein Vater ist nach Berlin gefahren. (Without direct object)
  • I have left the house.—— ich habe das Haus gelassen. (one verb)
  • I have let the bottle stand.—— ich habe die Flasche stehen2 lassen1. (two verbs)

3. Mixed verbs

Since they have mixed characteristics of weak and strong verbs, they are first conjugated like weak verbs to the third person subject in the present tense with a change in their stem vowel to “a” with exception of wissen which changes instead from “i” to “u” in addition to the prefix “ge-”. The weak verb conjugation column for stem-end “n” above can also be used for weak verbs. For example “nennen” becomes as displayed below.

Partizip II form of nennen

More examples;

VerbsAuxiliaryDerived Partizip IIEnglish past participle
nennen
denken
rennen
senden
brennen
bringen
wissen
kennen
wenden
haben
haben
sein
haben
haben
haben
haben
haben
haben
genannt
gedacht
gerannt
gesandt
gebrannt
gebracht
gewusst
gekannt
gewandt
named
thought
run
sent
burned
brought
known
known
turned
List of german mixed verbs in the Partizip II

Usage;

  • The animal has run so fast.—— das Tier ist so schnell gerannt.
  • How long have you known that?—— wie lange hast du das gewusst?
  • I have thought of you.—— ich habe an dich gedacht

4. Verbs ending with “-ieren”

This category of verbs is also weak and are obtained from foreign words. Like inseparable verbs, they make their Partizip II without the preposition “ge-” together with the auxiliary. To derive the Partizip II, these verbs are conjugated to the third person subject just like weak verbs.

Examples;

Usage;

Present tense verbsAuxiliaryPartizip IIEnglish Past participle
informieren
gratulieren
formulieren
studieren
lackieren
abonnieren
trainieren
telefonieren
ignorieren
passieren
markieren
stornieren
haben
haben
haben
haben
haben
haben
haben
haben
haben
haben
haben
haben
informiert
gratuliert
formuliert
studiert
lackiert
abonniert
trainiert
telefoniert
ignoriert
passiert
markiert
storniert
informed
congratulated
formulated
studied
vanished
subscribed
trained
telephoned
ignored
fit
marked
canceled
Partizip II of german verbs that end with -ieren
  • He has canceled the purchase.—— er hat den Kauf storniert.
  • She has studied.—— sie hat studiert.

5. Trennbare Verben (separable verbs)

To make the perfect tense with these verbs is as easy as the others. Depending on the root verb type (weak,strong or mixed) that is attached to the prefix, these verbs are treated like the previous verbs.

To derive the Partizip II of these verbs, the prefix must first be separated from the root verb and then the Partizip II prefix “-ge-” should be placed in between them. For example: aufmachen and ausgehen would be…

The root verb here is a weak/regelmäßiges Verb. Hence it is conjugated like a weak verb

Here, the root verb is a strong/regelmäßiges Verb and so it is treated like a strong verb

More examples…

VerbsAuxiliaryPartizip IIEnglish past participle
vorschlagen
nachsuchen
abschließen
aufräumen
anmachen
ausmachen
aufmachen
zumachen
vorhaben
nachkommen
nachdenken
mitkommen
mitnehmen
zuhören
losgehen
wegfahren
anfangen
stattfinden
zudecken
abreisen
herunterladen
mitmachen
vorstellen
beifügen
aufwachen
aufsetzen
aufstehen
einschlafen
weitermachen
kennenlernen
haben
haben
haben
haben
haben
haben
haben
haben
haben
sein
haben
sein
haben
haben
sein
sein
haben
haben
haben
sein
haben
haben
haben
haben
haben
haben
haben
sein
haben
haben
vorgeschlagen
nachgesucht
abgeschlossen
aufgeräumt
angemacht
ausgemacht
aufgemacht
zugemacht
vorgehabt
nachgekommen
nachgedacht
mitgekommen
mitgenommen
zugehört
losgegangen
weggefahren
angefangen
stattgefunden
zugedeckt
abgereist
heruntergeladen
mitgemacht
vorgestellt
beigefügt
aufgewacht
aufgesetzt
aufgestanden
eingeschlafen
weitergemacht
kennengelernt
suggested
searched
closed up
tidied
put on
put off
opened
closed
had in mind
honoured
pondered
come along
taken along
listened
started going
driven off
started
taken place
tucked-in
departed
downloaded
participated
introduced
attached
woken up
laid out
stood up
dozed off
continued
gotten to know
list of german separable verbs in the Partizip II

Usage;

  • The party has taken place on Monday.—— die Party hat am Montag stattgefunden.
  • Susan has fallen asleep.—— Susan hat eingeschlafen.
  • We have brought fruits along.—— wir haben Obst mitgebracht.
  • I have already departed from the airport.—— ich bin vom Flughafen schon abgereist.

6. Untrennbare Verben (inseparable verbs)

Because they cannot be detached from their root verbs. These verbs do require an auxiliary verb like the others but do not make their perfect tense with the prefix “ge-”. Instead, they are treated based on their type of root verb. What this means is that, inseparable verbs with weak/regelmäßige Verben should be conjugated to the third person subject. Those with strong/unregelmäßige Verben should make the necessary perfect tense stem-changes while retaining its verb-end “-en” and those of mixed verbs should be treated accordingly as well. See the illustrations below…

Partizip II of german inseparable verbs

More examples;

Present tense verbAuxiliaryPartizip IIEnglish past participle
vergeben
vergessen
verlieren
verkaufen
erleben
erkennen
erlauben
ertrinken
gehören
gefallen
gebären
missbrauchen
vollenden
verlieben
zerschneiden
verheiraten
bezahlen
benehmen
erinnern
gebrauchen
beginnen
besuchen
vermissen
verpassen
übergeben
verleben
übernachten
behandeln
unterschreiben
untersuchen
überraschen
unternehmen
übersenden
versuchen
überzeugen
bestätigen
beschneiden
verschneiden
versorgen
verscheiden
versagen
versprechen
haben
haben
haben
haben
haben
haben
haben
haben
haben
haben
haben
haben
haben
haben
haben
haben
haben
haben
haben
haben
haben
haben
haben
haben
haben
haben
haben
haben
haben
haben
haben
haben
haben
haben
haben
haben
haben
haben
haben
haben
haben
haben
vergeben
vergessen
verloren
verkauft
erlebt
erkannt
erlaubt
ertrunken
gehört
gefallen
geboren
missbraucht
vollendet
verliebt
zerschnitten
verheiratet
bezahlt
benommen
erinnert
gebraucht
begonnen
besucht
vermisst
verpasst
übergeben
verleben
übernachten
behandelt
unterschrieben
untersucht
überrascht
unternommen
übersandt
versucht
überzeugt
bestätigt
beschnitten
verschnitten
versorgt
verschieden
versagt
versprochen
forgiven
forgotten
lost
sold
experienced
recognized
allowed
drowned
belonged to
pleased
born
misused
finished
beloved
cut into pieces
married off
paid
behaved
remembered
used
begun
visited
missed
missed
transferred
spent
lodged
treated
signed
examined
surprised
undertaken
transmitted
tried
convinced
confirmed
circumcised
castrated
nursed
differentiated
misfired
promised
List of german inseparable verbs in the Partizip II

Usage;

  • I have signed the documents.—— ich habe die Unterlagen unterschrieben.
  • We have once sold clothes.—— wir haben einmal Kleidung verkauft.
  • Has the network still not transmitted?—— hat das Netz noch nicht übersandt?

**Note: all of the examples in English can be replaced with the simple past tense and still be translated by online dictionaries the same way in German. This is just the foundational basics.

2 thoughts on “PAST TENSE : the perfect/past participle tense

Leave a Reply